New oil boom coming to San Juan Basin. Let the BLM know you care about the land.

New oil boom coming to San Juan Basin - The Santa Fe New Mexican Last week, the Santa Fe New Mexican (link above) described the scale of oil and gas development planned for the San Juan Basin. Truly nothing short of a boom, it will effect the public lands we enjoy, the scenery we love, the night skies we adore, and the health of the rivers and streams we fish. Let's  seek a balanced approach that minimizes the impacts, and provide our input.

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Latinos’ love for the land overlooked | ABQJournal Online

 

Latinos are more likely than other ethnic groups to vote for candidates who favor conservation and to vote against those who don’t. That should be a wake-up call for politicians.

HECHO Director Rod Torrez comments further on the Colorado College Poll in an Albuquerque Journal guest column on Sunday, February 23.

Latinos’ love for the land overlooked | ABQJournal Online.

Colorado College Poll: Conservation Is a Key Issue for Latinos

Colorado College Poll: Conservation Is a Key Issue for Latinos

Whether I was surrounded by organ pipe cacti or ponderosa pine, whether there was bare rock underfoot or fertile soil, I realized that every place had provided our ancestors with sustenance and healing. Every place evoked stories. Every place held spiritual value. And sadly, nearly every place was threatened.

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Blog: Moab Plan a Step Towards Protecting Cultural and Recreational Land Use

The Arches and Canyonlands of Utah evoke thoughts of remoteness and mystery, fantastical vistas, wild geological formations, and voices echoing impossible distances. For many of us who live out west, these places represent the heart of what it means to find solitude and be in touch with the land, in love with the landscape, tiny in comparison to creation, and more grand in spirit than one could ever imagine. These places open the soul.

Now imagine if oil and gas rigs marred the stunning vistas, and a spaghetti of access roads scarred the solitude. Instead of hearing ravens and wind, you could hear the clank and clamor of the extractive industry. Imagine mountain biking or hiking on trails criss-crossed by truck traffic and heavy machinery, or fishing a polluted river.

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